Washington, DC Chef’s Table: Extraordinary Recipes from the Nation’s Capital

[ Washington, DC Chef’s Table: Extraordinary Recipes from the Nation’s Capital Kanter, Beth ( Author ) ] { Hardcover } 2012

In Washington, DC, political rivals disagree on just about everything, but there is widespread bi-partisan support for the city’s restaurant scene. The nation’s capital and neighboring suburbs boast premier restaurants and inspired chefs who bring even the most hardened adversaries, to the table. Now, everyone, inside and outside the beltway, can savor a taste of the best Washington has to offer. With tantalizing recipes from more than 50 of the capital’s most celebrated chefs and 100 beautiful full-color photographs, Washington, DC Chef’s Table is a feast for the eyes as well as the palate.

 

 

by Livaudais, www.mimsonlinemarket.com All Rights Reserved 2017-2018

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Mim’s RECIPES and COOKBOOKS are pleased to be back!  If you have been to New Orleans you know how good the food can be! Also, check out the Deals we have listed from Amazon and other stores on our website. Great price for Rachel Ray’s Bakeware! Great Gift Giving Ideas too!
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by Livaudais, mimsonlinemarket.com All Rights Reserved 2016-2018.

Rachael Ray Stoneware 3-Piece Serveware Set, Red

Rachael Ray Stoneware EVOO Oil Dispensing Bottle, Red

The New Orleans Cookbook

Two hundred eighty-eight delicious recipes carefully worked out so that you can reproduce, in your own kitchen, the true flavors of Cajun and Creole dishes. The New Orleans cookbook whose authenticity dependability, and wealth of information have made it a classic.

Many of you don’t know that Mim’s original roots come from New Orleans. Yep. She adores all the flavors from Nawlins. Try some of these out! Save Room for dessert! by JC Hines 04/02/2014 Revisions Mims Online Market. com All Rights Reserved 2014-2015.

Chicken Recipes To Die For

Life is too short to spend hours on end cooking complicated recipes using hard to source or expensive ingredients. In this book you will find recipes for over 50 of the world’s most popular chicken dishes, packed with flavor, and quick and easy to make. There is something to suit every palate – even the fussiest of eaters will be asking for second helpings.

Inside Chicken Recipes To Die for you will find the following recipes:-

Baked Chicken Thighs
BBQ Chicken
Beer Can Chicken
Bourbon Chicken
Buffalo Chicken Dip
Butter Chicken – The Easiest and Tastiest Recipe Ever
Chicken a la King
Chicken Adobo
Chicken Alfredo
Chicken Biryani
Chicken Cacciatore
Chicken Casserole
Chicken Cordon Bleu
Chicken Curry
Chicken Enchiladas
Chicken Fajitas
Chicken Fried Rice
Chicken Gumbo
Chicken Kiev
Chicken Korma
Chicken Lasagna
Chicken Marsala
Chicken Noodle Soup
Chicken Nuggets
Chicken Paprikash
Chicken Parmesan
Chicken Parmigiana
Chicken Piccata
Chicken Pie
Chicken Pot Pie
Chicken Quesadilla
Chicken Salad With Tarragon
Chicken Satay
Chicken Souvlaki
Chicken Spaghetti
Chicken Stir Fry
Chicken Tenders
Chicken Tortilla Soup
Chicken Vindaloo
Chilli Chicken
Cream of Chicken Soup
Fried Chicken Take-away Style
Jerk Chicken
Kung Pao Chicken
Lemon Chicken
Moroccan Chicken
Orange Chicken
Oven Fried Chicken
Roast Chicken Done To Perfection
Sesame Chicken
Sweet and Sour Chicken
Tandoori Chicken
Teriyaki Chicken

To start cooking these delicious dishes, scroll up and click on “Buy Now” to deliver almost instantly to your Kindle or other reading device.

1967 Ad, Brer Rabbit Molasses, with New Orleans Style Bran ‘n Molasses Muffins Recipe

Vintage 1960s magazine advertisement, Brer Rabbit Molasses, with New Orleans Style Bran ‘n Molasses Muffins recipe, 1967

Published in Family Circle, Nov. 1967, Vol. 71, No. 5.

Fair use/no known copyright. If you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license)

Cooking class, Vietnam

Stuffed, grilled mackerel wrapped in banana leaf. Cooking lesson in Hoi An, Vietnam. Recipe on next photo…

Bean By Bean: A Cookbook

More than 175 Recipes for Fresh Beans, Dried Beans, Cool Beans, Hot Beans, Savory Beans, Even Sweet Beans!

Has there ever been a more generous ingredient than the bean? Down-home, yet haute, soul-satisfyingly hearty, valued, versatile deeply delectable, healthful, and inexpensive to boot, there’s nothing a bean can’t do—and nothing that Crescent Dragonwagon can’t do with beans. From old friends like chickpeas and pintos to rediscovered heirloom beans like rattlesnake beans and teparies, from green beans and fresh shell beans to peanuts, lentils, and peas, Bean by Bean is the definitive cookbook on beans. It’s a 175-plus recipe cornucopia overflowing with information, kitchen wisdom, lore, anecdotes, and a zest for good food and good times.

Consider the lentil, to take one example. Discover it first in a delicious slather, Lentil Tapenade. Then in half a dozen soups, including Sahadi’s Lebanese Lentil Soup with Spinach, Kerala-Style Dahl, and Crescent’s Very, Very Best Lentil, Mushroom & Barley Soup. It then turns up in Marinated Lentils De Puy with Greens, Baked Beets, Oranges & Walnuts. Plus there’s Jamaica Jerk-Style Lentil-Vegetable Patties, Ethiopian Lentil Stew, and Lentil-Celeriac Skillet Sauce. Do the same for black beans—from Tex-Mex Frijoles Dip to Feijoada Vegetariana to Maya’s Magic Black Beans with Eggplant & Royal Rice. Or shell beans—Newly Minted Puree of Fresh Favas, Baked Limas with Rosy Sour Cream, Edamame in a Pod. And on and on—from starters and soups to dozens of entrees. Even desserts: Peanut Butter Cup Brownies and Red Bean Ice Cream.

Pecan , Carya illinoinensis ….#4

Taken on June 11, 2012 in Waco city, Texas state, Southern of America.

Vietnamese named : Dẻ, Mạy Châu, Hồ Đào .
Common names : Pecan
Scientist name : Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch
Synonyms : Carya oliviformis (Michx. f.) Nutt.
Carya pecan (Marsh.) Engl. & Graebn.
Hicoria pecan (Marsh.) Britton
Family : Juglandaceae – Walnut family
Kingdom: Plantae – Plants
Subkingdom : Tracheobionta – Vascular plants
Superdivision: Spermatophyta – Seed plants
Division: Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants
Class: Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
Subclass: Hamamelididae
Order: Juglandales
Genus: Carya Nutt. – hickory
Species: Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch – pecan

**** www.botanyvn.com/cnt.asp?param=edir&v=Juglandaceae&am… : NÓI VỀ HỌ ỐC CHÓ
Juglandaceae A. Rich. ex Kunth 1824

Cây to thường vỏ nứt dọc. Lá kép lông chim lẻ 1 lần, không có lá kèm.

Cụm hoa đơn tính dạng đuôi sóc. Hoa đơn tính với các hoa cái có các lá hoa phát triển dạng lá nguyên xẻ 3 thuỳ. Hoa cái có bầu dưới, 1 ô, 1 noãn , vòi dính gốc vòi 2 – 4 cành.

Quả hạch khi chín nứt thành 3 – 4 mảnh hay quả bế có cánh

Thế giới có 8 chi, 70 loài, phân bố ở Chủ yếu là ôn đới và á nhiệt đới, bắc bán cầu, ít ở nhiệt đới và ôn đới Nam Mỹ.

Việt Nam có 6 chi, 10 loài.

Phân loại: Họ được chia làm 2 phân họ: Juglandoideae có 2 chi: Juglans và Carya và Oreomunneoideae có 6 chi: Pterocarya, Engelhardtia, Oreomunea, Platicarya, Alfaroa. Mối quan hệ của họ này chưa rõ ràng, một số cho rằng nó có quan hệ với họ Bồ hòn. Nó xuất phát từ họ Rhoipteleaceae, một họ đặc hữu của bắc Việt Nam và nam Trung Hoa. Nó phân biệt với Juglandaceae bởi hoa lưỡng tính và hoa cái, bầu trên, có lá kèm và quả có cánh.

Công dụng: Ăn quả (Juglans regia), lấy tinh dầu, lấy gỗ và làm cảnh.

____________________________________________________________

**** plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=cail2
**** www.wildflower.org/gallery/result.php?id_image=2266
**** www.floridata.com/ref/c/cary_ill.cfm
**** www.hear.org/starr/images/image/?q=110601-6044&o=plants
**** www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Carya+illinoinensis

**** en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pecan
The pecan ( /pɨˈkɑːn/, /pɨˈkæn/, or /ˈpiːkæn/), Carya illinoinensis, is a species of hickory, native to south-central North America, in Mexico from Coahuila south to Jalisco and Veracruz,[1][2] in the United States from southern Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, and Indiana east to western Kentucky, southwestern Ohio, North Carolina, South Carolina, and western Tennessee, south through Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Florida, and west into New Mexico.
"Pecan" is from an Algonquian word, meaning a nut requiring a stone to crack

Growth
The pecan tree is a large deciduous tree, growing to 20–40 m (66–130 ft) in height, rarely to 44 m (144 ft);[2] taller trees to 50–55 m (160–180 ft) have been claimed but not verified. It typically has a spread of 12–23 m (39–75 ft) with a trunk up to 2 m (6.6 ft) diameter. A 10-year-old sapling will stand about 5 m (16 ft) tall. The leaves are alternate, 30–45 cm (12–18 in) long, and pinnate with 9–17 leaflets, each leaflet 5–12 cm (2.0–4.7 in) long and 2–6 cm (0.79–2.4 in) broad. The flowers are wind-pollinated, and monoecious, with staminate and pistillate catkins on the same tree; the male catkins are pendulous, up to 18 cm (7.1 in) long; the female catkins are small, with three to six flowers clustered together.

Male catkins in spring
A pecan, like the fruit of all other members of the hickory genus, is not truly a nut, but is technically a drupe, a fruit with a single stone or pit, surrounded by a husk. The husks are produced from the exocarp tissue of the flower, while the part known as the nut develops from the endocarp and contains the seed. The nut itself is dark brown, oval to oblong, 2.6–6 cm (1.0–2.4 in) long and 1.5–3 cm (0.59–1.2 in) broad. The outer husk is 3–4 mm (0.12–0.16 in) thick, starts out green and turns brown at maturity, at which time it splits off in four sections to release the thin-shelled nut.[2][4][5][6]
The nuts of the pecan are edible, with a rich, buttery flavor. They can be eaten fresh or used in cooking, particularly in sweet desserts, but also in some savory dishes. One of the most common desserts with the pecan as a central ingredient is the pecan pie, a traditional southern U.S. recipe. Pecans are also a major ingredient in praline candy, most often associated with New Orleans.
In addition to the pecan nut, the wood is also used in making furniture and wood flooring, as well as flavoring fuel for smoking meats.

Cultivation

Pecans with and without shells

A large pecan tree in downtown Abilene, Texas
Pecans were one of the most recently domesticated major crops. Although wild pecans were well-known among the colonial Americans as a delicacy, the commercial growing of pecans in the United States did not begin until the 1880s.[8] Today, the U.S. produces between 80% and 95% of the world’s pecans, with an annual crop of 150–200 thousand tons [9] from more than 10 million trees.[10] The nut harvest for growers is typically around mid-October. Historically, the leading pecan-producing state in the U.S. has been Georgia, followed by Texas, New Mexico and Oklahoma; they are also grown in Arizona, South Carolina and Hawaii. Outside the United States, pecans are grown in Australia, Brazil, China, Israel, Mexico, Peru and South Africa. They can be grown approximately from USDA hardiness zones 5 to 9, provided summers are also hot and humid.
Pecan trees may live and bear edible nuts for more than 300 years. They are mostly self-incompatible, because most cultivars, being clones derived from wild trees, show incomplete dichogamy. Generally, two or more trees of different cultivars must be present to pollinate each other.

Choosing cultivars can be a complex practice, based on the Alternate Bearing Index and their period of pollinating. Commercial planters are most concerned with the Alternate Bearing Index, which describes a cultivar’s likelihood to bear on an alternating years (index of 1.0 signifies highest likelihood of bearing little to nothing every other year).[11] The period of pollination groups all cultivars into two families: those that shed pollen before they can receive pollen (protandrous), and those that shed pollen after becoming receptive to pollen (protogynous).[12] Planting cultivars from both families within 250 feet is recommended for proper pollination.

Diseases
Main article: List of pecan diseases
In the southeastern United States, nickel deficiency in C. Illinoinensis produces a disorder called mouse-ear in trees fertilized with urea.[13] An enzyme within the leaves uses nickel during the conversion of urea to ammonia, and a deficiency results in the toxic accumulation of urea. Symptoms of mouse-ear include rounded or blunt leaflet tips which produces smaller leaflets, dwarfing of tree organs, poorly developed root systems, rosetting, delayed bud break, loss of apical dominance, and necrosis of leaflet tips. Mouse-ear can be treated with foliar sprays of nickel.
A similar condition results from a zinc deficiency, which also can be treated by foliar sprays

Nutrition
Pecans
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy2,889 kJ (690 kcal)
Carbohydrates13.86
– Starch0.46
– Sugars3.97
– Dietary fiber9.6
Fat71.97
– saturated6.18
– monounsaturated40.801
– polyunsaturated21.614
Protein9.17
Water3.52
Vitamin A56 IU
– beta-carotene29 μg (0%)
– lutein and zeaxanthin17 μg
Thiamine (vit. B1)0.66 mg (57%)
Riboflavin (vit. B2).13 mg (11%)
Niacin (vit. B3)1.167 mg (8%)
Pantothenic acid (B5)0.863 mg (17%)
Vitamin B60.21 mg (16%)
Folate (vit. B9)22 μg (6%)
Vitamin C1.1 mg (1%)
Vitamin E1.4 mg (9%)
Vitamin K3.5 μg (3%)
Calcium70 mg (7%)
Iron2.53 mg (19%)
Magnesium121 mg (34%)
Manganese4.5 mg (214%)
Phosphorus277 mg (40%)
Potassium410 mg (9%)
Sodium0 mg (0%)
Zinc4.53 mg (48%)
Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient Database

Pecans are a good source of protein and unsaturated fats. Like walnuts (which pecans resemble), pecans are rich in omega-6 fatty acids, although pecans contain about half as much omega-6 as walnuts.
A diet rich in nuts can lower the risk of gallstones in women. The antioxidants and plant sterols found in pecans reduce high cholesterol by reducing the "bad" LDL cholesterol levels.
Clinical research published in the Journal of Nutrition (September 2001) found that eating about a handful of pecans each day may help lower cholesterol levels similar to what is often seen with cholesterol-lowering medications.[19] Research conducted at the University of Georgia has also confirmed that pecans contain plant sterols, which are known for their cholesterol-lowering ability.[20] Pecans may also play a role in neurological health. Eating pecans daily may delay age-related muscle nerve degeneration, according to a study conducted at the University of Massachusetts and published in Current Topics in Nutraceutical Research.
The Lazy Magnolia Brewing Company from Kiln, Mississippi has produced a variety of beer using pecans rather than hops.

Evolutionary development
The pecan, Carya illinoinensis, is a member of the Juglandaceae family. Juglandaceae are represented worldwide by between seven and 10 extant genera and more than 60 species. Most of these species are concentrated in the Northern Hemisphere of the New World, but can be found on every continent except for Antarctica. The first fossil examples of the family appear during the Cretaceous. Differentiation between the subfamilies of Engelhardioideae and Juglandioideae occurred during the early Paleogene, about 64 million years ago. Extant examples of Engelharioideae are generally tropical and evergreen, while those of Juglandioideae are deciduous and found in more temperate zones. The second major step in the development of the pecan was a change from wind-dispersed fruits to animal dispersion. This dispersal strategy coincides with the development of a husk around the fruit and a drastic change in the relative concentrations of fatty acids. The ratio of oleic to linoleic acids are inverted between wind- and animal-dispersed seeds.[22][23] Further differentiation from other species of Juglandaceae occurred about 44 million years ago during the Eocene. The fruits of the pecan genus Carya differ from those of the walnut genus Juglans only in the formation of the husk of the fruit. The husks of walnuts develop from the bracts, bracteoles, and sepals, or sepals only. The husks of pecans develop from the bracts and the bracteoles only

History
Before European settlement, pecans were widely consumed and traded by Native Americans. As a food source, pecans are a natural choice for preagricultural society. They can provide two to five times more calories per unit weight than wild game, and require no preparation. As a wild forage, the fruit of the previous growing season are commonly still edible when found on the ground. Hollow tree trunks, found in abundance in pecan stands, offer ideal storage of pecans by humans and squirrels alike.[10]
Pecans first became known to Europeans in the 16th century. The first Europeans to come into contact with pecans were Spanish explorers in what is now Mexico, Texas, and Louisiana. The genus Carya does not exist in the Old World. Because of their familiarity with the genus Juglans, these early explorers referred to the nuts as nogales and nueces, the Spanish terms for "walnut trees" and "fruit of the walnut." They noted the particularly thin shell and acorn-like shape of the fruit, indicating they were indeed referring to pecans.[10] The Spaniards brought the pecan into Europe, Asia, and Africa beginning in the 16th century. In 1792, William Bartram reported in his botanical book, Travels, a nut tree, Juglans exalata that some botanists today argue was the American pecan tree, but others argue was hickory, Carya ovata.[24] Pecan trees are native to the United States, and writing about the pecan tree goes back to the nation’s founders. Thomas Jefferson planted pecan trees, Carya illinoinensis (Illinois nuts), in his nut orchard at his home, Monticello, in Virginia. George Washington reported in his journal that Thomas Jefferson gave him "Illinois nuts", pecans, which George Washington then grew at Mount Vernon, his Virginia home.

Breeding and breeding programs
Active breeding and selection programs are carried out by USDA-ARS[25] with growing locations at Brownwood and College Station, Texas. While selection work has been done since the late 1800s, most acreage of pecans grown today are of older cultivars, such as ‘Stuart’, ‘Schley’, ‘Desirable’, with known flaws but also with known production potential. The long cycle time for pecan trees plus financial considerations dictate that new varieties go through an extensive vetting process before being widely planted. Numerous examples of varieties produce well in Texas, but fail in the Southeastern U.S. due to increased disease pressure. Selection programs are ongoing at the state level, with Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kansas, Florida, Missouri and others having trial plantings.
Varieties that are adapted from the southern tier of States up through some parts of Iowa and even into southern Canada are available from nurseries. Production potential drops significantly when planted further north than Tennessee. Most breeding efforts for northern-adapted varieties have not been on a large enough scale to significantly impact production. Varieties that are available and adapted (e.g., ‘Major’, ‘Martzahn’, ‘Witte’, ‘Greenriver’, and ‘Posey’) in zones 6 and further north are almost entirely selections from wild stands. A northern-adapted variety must be grafted onto a northern rootstock to avoid freeze damage.
The pecan is a 32-chromosome species, and can hybridize with other 32-chromosome members of the Carya genus, such as Carya ovata, Carya laciniosa, and Carya cordiformis. Most such hybrids are unproductive, though a few second-generation hybrids have potential for producing hickory-flavored nuts with pecan nut structure. Such hybrids are referred to as "hicans" to indicate their hybrid origin.

Symbolism
In 1906, Texas Governor James Stephen Hogg asked that a pecan tree be planted at his grave instead of a traditional headstone, requesting that the nuts be distributed throughout the state to make Texas a "Land of Trees".[9] His wish was carried out and this brought more attention to pecan trees. In 1919, the 36th Texas Legislature made the pecan tree the state tree of Texas.
In southeast Texas, the Texas Pecan Festival is celebrated every year. There is also an annual Pecan Festival in Colfax, Louisiana in the month of November.

300 Best Potato Recipes: A Complete Cook’s Guide

The humble potato is a culinary powerhouse and inspires adventurous and tantalizing fare.

A “desert island” vegetable if ever there was one, the potato appeals to all of us, whether in the form of traditional comfort dishes or in the guise of the new and exotic. Versatile, nutritious, inexpensive and unfailingly delicious, no other vegetable, and few foods in general, can make those claims.

These are just some of the delicious possibilities that the humble potato offers in this wide and varied assortment of recipes:

  • Classic mash de luxe
  • Garlic roasties with rosemary
  • Real English chips
  • Gnocchi-roni and cheese
  • Saffron potato cakes
  • All-American potato pancakes
  • Sweet potato-crusted shrimp
  • East Coast chowder
  • Creole potato salad
  • French potato galette
  • Fennel, potato and white bean stew
  • Potato lasagna
  • Oyster pie with top mash
  • Sweet potato gnocchi
  • Mennonite country potato doughnuts
  • Potato fudge.

Appetizers and snacks, soups and salads, side dishes, main courses, hearty vegetarian main dishes, baked goods and desserts make up this vast and colorful collection of recipes. The author also includes a complete history and origins of potatoes as well as a comprehensive chapter that covers hundreds of potato varieties.

Product Features

  • The humble potato is a culinary powerhouse and inspires adventurous and tantalizing fare. A “de…
  • 368 pages, softcover
  • Dimensions: 10″H × 7″W


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